The phrase “being born with a silver spoon in your mouth” does not deserve the unpleasant connotations that it has in today’s society; we only need to look at ancient civilizations and their practices to see why.

Silver has been used since its discovery 5000 years ago and has been synonymous with wealth and currency for millennia. Like its fellow precious metals, silver was commonly acquired for its investment value, however it also has other attributes that are slowly reemerging into public knowledge. Have you ever wondered why civilizations have been using silver for centuries? Although silver has long been long admired for its luscious appearance, its origins for use outside currency and jewellery lie in its health benefits.

A GEORGIAN STERLING SILVER SPIRIT KETTLE ON STAND, BY JOHN EAMES, LONDON, CIRCA 1806
$2,000-4,000

Favorable for its high conductivity and appearance, silver also possesses antibacterial, antiseptic, and antimicrobial qualities and has less toxicity than other heavy metals, making it an attractive utensil for everyday use. With silver’s ability to kill most germs, some believe that using silver utensils for dining can improve immunity. Studies have shown that silver also keeps food fresher for longer. In fact, ancient civilizations would use silver vessels to store wine, vinegar, and water.

Sterling silver can be affordable on the auction market and is readily available, however due to its presumed value and assumed cleaning maintenance, is often wrapped away in a drawer and reserved for special occasions or mistaken for newcomer stainless steel. However, if silver is used daily, cleaning becomes less of a chore and the pieces may only require a freshen up once a year.

I would strongly encourage any fellow antiques enthusiasts to consider investing in a silver set or a lovely set of wine goblets and start enjoying the lifelong benefits.

Upcoming in our October Decorative Arts sale we present a selection of sterling silver dining ware including a beautiful set of champagne coupes, a set of Georgian silver plates, and a set of fiddle, thread and shell flatware, and many other pieces.

CHIARA CURCIO / Head of Decorative Arts

Need advice on buying or selling silver?
Please contact Chiara Curcio, Head of Decorative Arts on 0412 653 315

October 2020